Ransomware gang caught using Microsoft-approved drivers to hack targets

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Security researchers say they have evidence that threat actors affiliated with the Cuba ransomware gang used malicious hardware drivers certified by Microsoft during a recent attempted ransomware attack.

Drivers — software that enables operating systems and apps to access and communicate with hardware devices — require highly privileged access to the operating system and its data, which is why Windows requires drivers to bear an approved cryptographic signature before they can be loaded. Cybercriminals have long exploited these drivers, frequently employing a “bring your own vulnerable driver” strategy in which hackers exploit vulnerabilities discovered within an existing Windows driver from a legitimate software publisher.

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Ransomware gang caught using Microsoft-approved drivers to hack targets

Security researchers say they have evidence that threat actors affiliated with the Cuba ransomware gang used malicious hardware drivers certified by Microsoft during a recent attempted ransomware attack.

Drivers — software that enables operating systems and apps to access and communicate with hardware devices — require highly privileged access to the operating system and its data, which is why Windows requires drivers to bear an approved cryptographic signature before they can be loaded. Cybercriminals have long exploited these drivers, frequently employing a “bring your own vulnerable driver” strategy in which hackers exploit vulnerabilities discovered within an existing Windows driver from a legitimate software publisher.

Disclaimer

We strive to uphold the highest ethical standards in all of our reporting and coverage. We StartupNews.fyi want to be transparent with our readers about any potential conflicts of interest that may arise in our work. It’s possible that some of the investors we feature may have connections to other businesses, including competitors or companies we write about. However, we want to assure our readers that this will not have any impact on the integrity or impartiality of our reporting. We are committed to delivering accurate, unbiased news and information to our audience, and we will continue to uphold our ethics and principles in all of our work. Thank you for your trust and support.

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